Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Snuffing the Rooster

Scott just sold Chase his demon possessed bike named "the Rooster". This damn bike tried to kill Scott on several different occasions, I'm not going to get into all that here, but this fucker was cursed from the get. Here's the low down on the bike itself: It's a lugged steel Trek 400 frame, Cane Creek 1" threadless headset, Ultegra cranks with the external bearing bottom bracket. Shimano Deore rear derailer, (I'm not speaking french) and a front derailer I can't quite make out. The Fork is a 1" carbon fork, not sure of the make or model, but it's nice and light. It's actually the same fork Scott gave me to replace my bent steel fork when I wrecked into a park bench on the .83 Thanksgiving ride. Scott, being the handsome, and all around wonderful guy that he is, threw in a Profile Designs bullhorn bar. Considering the fact that the rooster is obviously cursed, Chase and I decided there's no way in hell he should convert that thing to a fixed gear, that being said we're building an awesome geared bike. We also decided that white bikes are bad luck, (i.e. Ghost Bikes) so we went ahead and took everything off the frame and began the process of stripping the paint. Neither of us had ever done this before, and after a few hours of research, it seems relatively simple. So far we've applied one coat of paint stripper and scraped and scrubbed the first few layers of paint away. Some parts had better luck than others, probably due to a more generous coat of the paint stripper. Hopefully in the next day or so we can have the thing down to the bare steel and start sanding/priming it. As for now the color scheme is kind of a secret, mainly because it's still kind of up in the air. But it's looking like it'll be a light, sky blue, with primer while lugs and a thousand pounds of awesome. I kinda think we should let a little of the rooster's original trek USA white roots shine through. Updates will continue...

1 comment:

Scott said...

Don't forget to lacquer it after you paint it, but before putting it together. Polyurethane will work great.